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Ingleton is a tourist honeypot in the Yorkshire Dales. It is an ideal location to study rivers (via the Ingleton Waterfalls Trail), limestone scenery (there are two limestone caves that are worth a visit – Ingleborough Cave and White Scar cave) and the impact and management of tourism. Ingleton Waterfalls Trail is a well-known circular trail beginning and ending in the village of Ingleton in the English county of North Yorkshire. The video below shows Thornton Force on the River Twiss which features on the Ingleton Waterfalls Trail.

Both the Waterfalls Trail and the caverns incur a cost.

In addition to this Gaping Gill, a deep pothole with the stream Fell Beck flowing into it, is worth a visit but be sure to complete a full risk assessment before visiting with a group!

There is plenty of parking within the village including several council owned car parks along with the car park at the waterfalls. Parking is not free.

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A fantastic opportunity for studying glaciation, rivers, rural environments and tourism. Easedale Beck is ideal for a river study and Grasmere for a tourism study.  You can also complete ambien no prescription sketches of the valleys for glaciation.

Accommodation is available at Grasmere YH for up to 80.

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Aysgarth Falls

Aysgarth Falls are a series of waterfalls over a one mile stretch of the River Ure in the Yorkshire Dales. In additional to the waterfalls the banks of the river in this area contain many potholes (round / oval shaped holes in the bedrock of the river bed).

The video below shows examples of potholes close to Aysgarth Falls.

The video below shows a waterfall at Aysgarth Falls.

Parking is available at both the National Park Information Centre and the Aysgarth Falls cafe.

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 The Blencathra Centre

The Blencathra Centre occupies a dramatic setting at 300m on a south facing slope of Blencathra in The Lake District National Park and offers an unparalleled panorama across the Keswick, Helvellyn and Skiddaw areas. Purposely converted from a former Sanatorium in 1993 these unique buildings provide field courses for schools and universities at all levels as well as a programme of courses for individuals and families. It is primarily a residential centre with increasing numbers of day visitors partly as a result of a close working relationship with the YHA.The Blencathra Centre is part of the Field Studies Council, an environmental education charity.As such it is important that we try to ‘practice what we preach ’and promote the importance of sustainability to our visitors. Every year we host more than 8000 learners from over 300 schools and universities .Our visitors come from all over the UK, and for many it is their first visit to the Lake District.  During their
courses, students come into contact with our approach to ‘green tourism’. It is a unique experience, enriched through an awareness of the special relationship between people and the environment.

You can find out more on the Blencathra Centre site.

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Morfa Harlech National Nature Reserve

Morfa Harlech National Nature Reserve is a nature reserve in Wales, located north of Harlech.

The reserve reaches across expanses of open sand and sea towards Snowdonia and contains one of the two extensive sand dune systems which make up much of the sandy Meirionnydd coastline, it carries particular importance as the only growing dune system in Wales.

Morfa Harlech sand dunes is an extensive dune system stretching northwards from the town of Harlech. The dunes cover 6 km², of which an area of about 1.5 km² in the middle has been afforested with Corsican Pine. Nearby is Harlech Castle, which due to the expanding dune system has been taken back 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) from its original online pharmacy position on the coastline 600 years ago. Morfa Harlech is one of Britain’s actively growing sand dune systems due to the longshore drift which is currently eroding the dunes at Morfa Dyffryn.

You can see images of Morfa Harlech on Geography Photos by Internet Geography.

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Birling Gap, East Sussex

At Birling Gap there is evidence of coastal erosion of the cliff where there are no defences. There are a row of fishing cottages, half of which have collapsed into the sea. The beach is accessible by stairs. There is a National Trust car park/coach park, toilets and pharmacy-no-rx.net shop/cafe nearby.

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Criccieth

Criccieth is a great location for looking at coastal defences as they have a wide range within a small area and a great ice cream shop at the top of the hill.

The view across the bay

The view across the bay

Students completing fieldwork at Criccieth

Students completing fieldwork at Criccieth

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Hornsea

A view of Hornsea beach consisting of sea defences including groynes

A view looking south at Hornsea.

Hornsea is an ideal location to complete fieldwork including beach profiles, sediment analysis, measuring longshore drift, cliff surveys and investigating the impact of coastal management (groynes). It is worth visiting the southern end of the beach (near the caravan park), where the sea defences end, there is a marked increase in the rate of erosion.

You can find out more about Hornsea on Internet Geography.

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Skipsea

If you are travelling down the Holderness coast it is worth calling in at Skipsea to see the impact of coastal erosion. Follow Mill Lane to Skipsea Sands to reach the area shown below.

Properties affected by coastal erosion at Skipsea.

Properties affected by coastal erosion at Skipsea.

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Abbots Hall Farm – Essex

Essex Wildlife Trust nature reserve. Activities and talks available. Great to investigate managed buytramadolbest.com retreat and coastline management plans and salt marsh succession. You can find out more on the Essex Wildlife Trust website.

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New Mills

Perfect mix between history and geography with the changing location of industry in a beautiful Peak District location!

If you have images to share of this area please send them to anthony.bennett@geographyfieldtrips.com

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Helvellyn and Striding Edge

Helvellyn - view from the top

Helvellyn

Classic upland glacial scenery can be found at Helvellyn in the Lake District. Access is possible from Glennriding with klonopin no prescription ample parking and amenities available.

Walkers on Striding Edge arete

Striding Edge arete

Arete close to Helvellyn

Arete

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Castleton

Street scene of Castleton in the Peak District

Castleton, a honeypot in the Peak District

Castleton is a great tourist honeypot location for completing fieldwork into the impact of tourism and limestone environments. It is easily accessible with plenty of parking.

You can find out more about Castleton on Internet Geography.

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Walton on The Naze – Essex

Walton on the Naze is an ideal location for beach profiling, coastal management, tourism, renewable energy (wind), estuarine environments and geology.

The beach is accessible via a short walk.

If you have images to share of this area cialis please send them to anthony.bennett@geographyfieldtrips.com

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River Derwent (NYM) – Upper Course

This section of the river Derwent is great for A Level river fieldwork.

There are two ways to access the River Derwent. The first is via Gatela Rd (and walking across the marked footpath through farmland) though you join the river some way from its source.

Students completing a study on the River Derwent

River Derwent field work

 

The alternative (and more adventurous route) is starting your walk on the A169 just north of  RAF Fylingdales here: 54.372838, -0.680477

Source of the River Derwent

Source of the River Derwent

 

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Cwm Idwal

Cwm Idwal and Llyn Idwal

Cwm Idwal and Llyn Idwal

Cwm Idwal is a corrie located in the Snowdonia National Park. Cwm Idwal is a spectacular product of glaciation, surrounded by high crags, screes, moraines and rounded rocks, with a lake on its floor (Llyn Idwal). Cwm Idwal comprises volcanic and sedimentary rock which was laid down in a shallow Ordovician sea, and later folded to give rise to the distinctive trough-shaped arrangement of strata known today as the Idwal Syncline. This fold in the rock is visible today, thanks to the layering of the sedimentary rocks. The area was then eroded by glacial action to form the classic semicircular valley.

It is accessible via the A5 and there is plenty of parking. Toilets are available to the public.

It is a 20 minute walk up to Cwm Idwal from the car park. These two managed it ok:

Image of two young children on the path to Cwm Idwal

Path to Cwm Idwal

You can view images of Cwm Idwal and the Nant Francon valley on Geography Photos by Internet Geography.

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Mappleton – coastal management scheme

Mappleton sea defences including a stone groin

Mappleton sea defences

In 1991 almost £2 million was spent on two rock groynes and a rock revetment to protect Mappleton and the B1242 coastal road. Blocks of granite were imported from Norway for the sea defences. The purpose of the two rock groynes was to trap beach material. As the result of the coastal management a substantial beach accumulated between the groynes halting erosion.

Free parking is available at the car park on the sea front. It is accessible to coaches. A public toilet is also available.

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High Force Waterfall on the River Tees

High Force waterfall

High Force waterfall

High Force is a spectacular waterfall on the River Tees in the County on Durham. High Force was formed where the River Tees crosses the Whin Sill – a hard layer of rock. The waterfall itself consists of two different types of rock. The upper band is made up of whinstone, a hard rock which the waterfall takes a lot of time to erode. Underlying the whin sill is a layer of of Carboniferous Limestone, a softer rock which is easily worn away by the waterfall. This creates a plunge pool beneath the waterfall. As the limestone is eroded the whin sill is left over hanging the waterfall. Eventually the overhang collapses.

If you are in the area it is also worth visiting Low Force.

You can find out more about High Force on Internet Geography.

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Spurn Point

Spurn Head Lighthouse

Spurn Head Lighthouse

An ideal location for investigating coastal deposition, longshore drift, the formation of a spit, sand dunes and marshes.

Find out more about Spurn Head on Internet Geography.

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Malham Cove

An image showing Malham Cove

Malham Cove

Malham Cove is an amphitheater shaped cliff formation of limestone rock. Water from Malham Tarn once flowed over the cliff. It is now a popular destination for climbers who dare to scale the 260ft cliff face.

There are a range of limestone features here. These include:
– a limestone pavement
– a resurgence

Parking is available in the village of Malham. Malham Cove is then approximately a 1 1/2 kms walk.

You can find out more on Internet Geography

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Catrake Force Waterfall

Throughout its course within Swaledale the River Swale is very fast flowing, and prone to rise rapidly in times of flood. The river rises on the slopes of High Seat and Nine Standards Rigg and becomes known as the Swale at the point where the becks of Birkdale and Great Sleddale meet. The river descends rapidly towards Keld, with a waterfall at Wain Wath Force, before descending into a narrow gorge below Keld and over Catrake Force, followed by Kisdon Force. From here the river descends a further 200m along the next 20 miles to Richmond Bridge. The steep sided tributary valleys also contain a number of spectacular waterfalls.

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Flamborough – Selwicks Bay

An annotated image of Selwicks Bay including a stack and wave cut platform

Selwicks Bay

An ideal location for investigating coastal erosional landforms including a bay, wave cut platform, arch, stack, stump and wave cut notch.

The location is easily accessible by coach. The services here include public toilets, a cafe and a souvenir shop.

Access to the bay is via a series of sets of stairs which can be potentially hazardous as they are steep and can be very slippery in winter. It is possible to follow a path north along the coast to get a good view of the bay. This location is potentially hazardous as it follows the cliff edge.

Find out more about Selwicks Bay in Internet Geography.

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Listing Results

  • Ingleton

    Ingleton

    Honeypot, Limestone Environment, Limestone features, Rivers, Tourism, Upland River

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  • Grasmere and Easedale Tarn

    Grasmere and Easedale Tarn

    Glacial Environment, Honeypot, Rivers, Tourism

    Read more
  • Aysgarth Falls

    Aysgarth Falls

    Rivers, Waterfall

    Read more
  • The Blencathra Centre

    The Blencathra Centre

    Glacial Environment, Rivers, Tourism, Upland Glaciation, Upland River

    Read more
  • Morfa Harlech, Nature Reserve

    Morfa Harlech, Nature Reserve

    Coastal Environment, Ecosystem, Sand Dunes

    Read more
  • Birling Gap, East Sussex

    Birling Gap, East Sussex

    Coastal Environment, Erosion, Erosional Landforms

    Read more
  • Criccieth

    Criccieth

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management

    Read more
  • Hornsea

    Hornsea

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management, Deposition Landforms, Erosion

    Read more
  • Skipsea

    Skipsea

    Coastal Environment, Erosion

    Read more
  • Abbots Hall Farm – Essex

    Abbots Hall Farm – Essex

    Agriculture, Coastal Environment, Coastal Management, Industry, Salt Marsh Succession

    Read more
  • New Mills

    New Mills

    Industry

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  • Helvellyn and Striding Edge

    Helvellyn and Striding Edge

    Glacial Environment, Upland Glaciation

    Read more
  • Castleton

    Castleton

    Honeypot, Tourism

    Read more
  • Walton on The Naze – Essex

    Walton on The Naze – Essex

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management, Deposition Landforms, Renewable Energy, Tourism, Wind

    Read more
  • River Derwent (NYM) – Upper Course

    River Derwent (NYM) – Upper Course

    Rivers, Upland River

    Read more
  • Cwm Idwal

    Cwm Idwal

    Glacial Environment, Upland Glaciation

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  • Mappleton

    Mappleton

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management

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  • High Force

    High Force

    Rivers, Waterfall

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  • Spurn Point

    Spurn Point

    Coastal Environment, Deposition Landforms

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  • Malham Cove

    Malham Cove

    Limestone Environment, Limestone Pavement, Resurgence

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  • Catrake Force Waterfall

    Catrake Force Waterfall

    Rivers, Waterfall

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  • Flamborough – Selwicks Bay

    Flamborough – Selwicks Bay

    Coastal Environment, Erosional Landforms

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