Navigation Menu

Morfa Harlech National Nature Reserve

Morfa Harlech National Nature Reserve is a nature reserve in Wales, located north of Harlech.

The reserve reaches across expanses of open sand and sea towards Snowdonia and contains one of the two extensive sand dune systems which make up much of the sandy Meirionnydd coastline, it carries particular importance as the only growing dune system in Wales.

Morfa Harlech sand dunes is an extensive dune system stretching northwards from the town of Harlech. The dunes cover 6 km², of which an area of about 1.5 km² in the middle has been afforested with Corsican Pine. Nearby is Harlech Castle, which due to the expanding dune system has been taken back 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) from its original online pharmacy position on the coastline 600 years ago. Morfa Harlech is one of Britain’s actively growing sand dune systems due to the longshore drift which is currently eroding the dunes at Morfa Dyffryn.

You can see images of Morfa Harlech on Geography Photos by Internet Geography.

More Information»

Birling Gap, East Sussex

At Birling Gap there is evidence of coastal erosion of the cliff where there are no defences. There are a row of fishing cottages, half of which have collapsed into the sea. The beach is accessible by stairs. There is a National Trust car park/coach park, toilets and pharmacy-no-rx.net shop/cafe nearby.

More Information»

Criccieth

Criccieth is a great location for looking at coastal defences as they have a wide range within a small area and a great ice cream shop at the top of the hill.

The view across the bay

The view across the bay

Students completing fieldwork at Criccieth

Students completing fieldwork at Criccieth

More Information»

Hornsea

A view of Hornsea beach consisting of sea defences including groynes

A view looking south at Hornsea.

Hornsea is an ideal location to complete fieldwork including beach profiles, sediment analysis, measuring longshore drift, cliff surveys and investigating the impact of coastal management (groynes). It is worth visiting the southern end of the beach (near the caravan park), where the sea defences end, there is a marked increase in the rate of erosion.

You can find out more about Hornsea on Internet Geography.

More Information»

Skipsea

If you are travelling down the Holderness coast it is worth calling in at Skipsea to see the impact of coastal erosion. Follow Mill Lane to Skipsea Sands to reach the area shown below.

Properties affected by coastal erosion at Skipsea.

Properties affected by coastal erosion at Skipsea.

More Information»

Abbots Hall Farm – Essex

Essex Wildlife Trust nature reserve. Activities and talks available. Great to investigate managed buytramadolbest.com retreat and coastline management plans and salt marsh succession. You can find out more on the Essex Wildlife Trust website.

More Information»

Walton on The Naze – Essex

Walton on the Naze is an ideal location for beach profiling, coastal management, tourism, renewable energy (wind), estuarine environments and geology.

The beach is accessible via a short walk.

If you have images to share of this area cialis please send them to anthony.bennett@geographyfieldtrips.com

More Information»

Mappleton – coastal management scheme

Mappleton sea defences including a stone groin

Mappleton sea defences

In 1991 almost £2 million was spent on two rock groynes and a rock revetment to protect Mappleton and the B1242 coastal road. Blocks of granite were imported from Norway for the sea defences. The purpose of the two rock groynes was to trap beach material. As the result of the coastal management a substantial beach accumulated between the groynes halting erosion.

Free parking is available at the car park on the sea front. It is accessible to coaches. A public toilet is also available.

More Information»

Spurn Point

Spurn Head Lighthouse

Spurn Head Lighthouse

An ideal location for investigating coastal deposition, longshore drift, the formation of a spit, sand dunes and marshes.

Find out more about Spurn Head on Internet Geography.

More Information»

Flamborough – Selwicks Bay

An annotated image of Selwicks Bay including a stack and wave cut platform

Selwicks Bay

An ideal location for investigating coastal erosional landforms including a bay, wave cut platform, arch, stack, stump and wave cut notch.

The location is easily accessible by coach. The services here include public toilets, a cafe and a souvenir shop.

Access to the bay is via a series of sets of stairs which can be potentially hazardous as they are steep and can be very slippery in winter. It is possible to follow a path north along the coast to get a good view of the bay. This location is potentially hazardous as it follows the cliff edge.

Find out more about Selwicks Bay in Internet Geography.

More Information»
All Listing Types All Locations Any Rating

Listing Results

  • Morfa Harlech, Nature Reserve

    Morfa Harlech, Nature Reserve

    Coastal Environment, Ecosystem, Sand Dunes

    Read more
  • Birling Gap, East Sussex

    Birling Gap, East Sussex

    Coastal Environment, Erosion, Erosional Landforms

    Read more
  • Criccieth

    Criccieth

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management

    Read more
  • Hornsea

    Hornsea

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management, Deposition Landforms, Erosion

    Read more
  • Skipsea

    Skipsea

    Coastal Environment, Erosion

    Read more
  • Abbots Hall Farm – Essex

    Abbots Hall Farm – Essex

    Agriculture, Coastal Environment, Coastal Management, Industry, Salt Marsh Succession

    Read more
  • Walton on The Naze – Essex

    Walton on The Naze – Essex

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management, Deposition Landforms, Renewable Energy, Tourism, Wind

    Read more
  • Mappleton

    Mappleton

    Coastal Environment, Coastal Management

    Read more
  • Spurn Point

    Spurn Point

    Coastal Environment, Deposition Landforms

    Read more
  • Flamborough – Selwicks Bay

    Flamborough – Selwicks Bay

    Coastal Environment, Erosional Landforms

    Read more